Thursday, May 31, 2012

Spelling bee

  • WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Snigdha Nandipati, a 14-year-old eighth grader from San Diego, won the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday by correctly spelling guetapens, a French word for an ambush.
  • (msnbc.com)
  • In the end, Lori Anne Madison couldn't charm the judges into accepting her misspelling. But the 6-year-old still managed to win the crowd's hearts as the youngest person ever to compete in the annual Scripps National Spelling Bee.
  • (Time)
  • By BEN NUCKOLS Associated Press OXON HILL, Md. (AP) - Snigdha Nandipati heard a few words she didnt know during the National Spelling Bee, but never when she stepped to the microphone.
  • (msnbc.com)
  • The most experienced speller remaining in the National Spelling Bee breezed through most of two semifinal rounds with his usual confidence. But with one word separating him from his first time in the finals, he was flustered.
  • (The Christian Science Monitor)
  • OXON HILL, Md. — Snigdha Nandipati heard a few words she didnt know during the National Spelling Bee, but never when she stepped to the microphone.
  • (Huffington Post)
  • OXON HILL, Md. (AP) -- Fifty semifinalists have taken the stage at the National Spelling Bee, including the sister of the 2009 winner and two five-time participants. Two Minnesotans, however, didnt make it though.
  • (Marketplace.publicradio.org)
  • May 30, 2012: Lori Anne Madison, 6, of Woodbridge, Va., the youngest speller ever to compete in the National Spelling Bee, reacts after misspelling her word, ingluvies, in the third round of the bee in Oxon Hill, Md.
  • (FOX News)
  • NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. - Frank Cahill of Parker stumbled in the finals of this years Scripps National Spelling Bee tonight after a spectacular run for the first-time national contestant. The word that tripped him up was porwigle, which means tadpole.
  • (9News)
  • NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. -- Each year, young people from all over the country are chosen to compete in a decades-old competition in the nations capital, entering a battle of wits from which only one winner can emerge.
  • (Charleston Daily Mail)

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